divert


divert
di|vert [daıˈvə:t, dı- US -ə:rt] v [T]
[Date: 1400-1500; : Old French; Origin: divertir, from Latin divertere, from vertere 'to turn']
1.) to change the use of something such as time or money
divert sth into/to/(away) from etc sth
The company should divert more resources into research.
Officials diverted revenue from arms sales to the rebels.
2.) to change the direction in which something travels
divert a river/footpath/road etc
Canals divert water from the Truckee River into the lake.
The high street is closed and traffic is being diverted .
3.) if you divert your telephone calls, you arrange for them to go directly to another number, for example because you are not able to answer them yourself for some time
Remember to divert your phone when you are out of the office.
4.) to deliberately take someone's attention from something by making them think about or notice other things
divert (sb's) attention (away from sb/sth)
The crime crackdown is an attempt to divert attention from social problems.
He'd been trying to divert suspicion away from himself.
5.) formal to amuse or entertain someone

Dictionary of contemporary English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • divert — di‧vert [daɪˈvɜːt, d ǁ ɜːrt] verb [transitive] COMMERCE to spend money or make an effort in a new area of business or a new product: divert something into • The company should divert more resources into research. * * * divert UK US /daɪˈvɜːt/… …   Financial and business terms

  • Divert — Di*vert , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Diverted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Diverting}.] [F. divertir, fr. L. divertere, diversum, to go different ways, turn aside; di = dis + vertere to turn. See {Verse}, and cf. {Divorce}.] 1. To turn aside; to turn off from… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • divert — di·vert /də vərt, dī / vt 1: to turn from one course or use to another funds illegally divert ed 2: to place (a defendant) under a diversion di·vert·er n Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law …   Law dictionary

  • divert — [v1] turn a different direction alter, avert, change, deflect, modify, pivot, redirect, sheer, swerve, switch, turn aside, veer, volte face, wheel, whip, whirl; concepts 187,213 Ant. be direct, keep to, maintain, stay divert [v2] amuse, entertain …   New thesaurus

  • Divert — Di*vert , v. i. To turn aside; to digress. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] I diverted to see one of the prince s palaces. Evelyn. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • divert — early 15c., from M.Fr. divertir (14c.), from L. divertere to turn in different directions, blended with devertere turn aside, from dis aside and de from + vertere to turn (see VERSUS (Cf. versus)). Related: Diverted; diverting …   Etymology dictionary

  • divert — 1 *turn, deflect, avert, sheer Analogous words: bend, *curve, twist: deviate, digress, diverge, *swerve, veer: *change, alter, modify Contrasted words: fix, *set, settle: absorb, engross, * …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • divert — ► VERB 1) cause to change course or take a different route. 2) reallocate (a resource) to a different purpose. 3) draw the attention of; distract or entertain. DERIVATIVES diverting adjective. ORIGIN Latin divertere turn in separate ways …   English terms dictionary

  • divert — [də vʉrt′, dīvʉrt′] vt. [ME diverten < OFr divertir < L divertere: see DIVERSE] 1. to turn (a person or thing) aside from a course, direction, etc. into another; deflect 2. to distract the attention of 3. to amuse; entertain SYN. AMUSE …   English World dictionary

  • divert */ — UK [daɪˈvɜː(r)t] / US [dɪˈvɜrt] / US [daɪˈvɜrt] verb [transitive] Word forms divert : present tense I/you/we/they divert he/she/it diverts present participle diverting past tense diverted past participle diverted 1) to make something move or… …   English dictionary


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